Your Rhinestone Eyes

Kyle Young's Photography

Permalink One of my more favorite photos from Gallifrey One
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ISO, Noise, File Format

ISO:

The international standard method for measuring the quantity of light to film’s sensitivity. In film the ISO indicates how sensitive the film is to light. The lower numbers, such as 50 to 100 indicate a low sensitivity. These films speeds are called Slow Films. High numbers like 400 and above are more sensitive and called Fast Films. The higher the number, the higher sensitivity to light. 

Film camera’s have a true ISO, unlike DSLR’s. Though the ISO settings on a Digital Camera closely corresponds to film. On traditional cameras (Film), you must expose the entire roll before you can change sensitivity. Digital photography allows you to change the ISO speeds on a picture to picture basis. My camera’s ISO speeds go from 100 - 3,200.

Noise and Grain:

Noise is to Digital Photography as Grain is to Film. It’s a spotted sand like texture that can ruin a photograph. The less of it, the better. It can be caused by heat from the electronics and optics, the technology cannot deal with fine tone quality like sky transitions, or image compression. Grain/Noise shows up when using higher ISO speeds. It’s more obvious with underexposure. Noise increases with long exposures in low-light conditions. 

File Formats:

When taking photos on a DSLR, the image will be converted to digital data. The data can be saved as either a RAW or JPEG file format. RAW format requires little processing on the camera while providing information on how the image was shot. It contains the max amount of data provided by the sensor, 14-bit color info (though the format is actually a 16 bit file).  JPEG is a standard format image compression. This format reduces the size of the file, allowing for more images to fit on the memory card, but less quality. JPEG images are faster and easier to deal with, while RAW can be much more heavily edited after the photo is taken. When I take pictures, I almost always leave the quality on RAW. I can always shrink a RAW file and edit it how I’d like, but I cannot enlarge a JPEG file and editing it will not be as easy. One of the most notable photographers to stand behind RAW File Format would be Jared Polin from FroKnowsPhoto.com

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More Film VS Digital

It’s nice to have a digital camera, though I do wish I was using film more often. They both have ups and downs. I know with film, I’d be much more careful and specific with my settings for the shot, while on a digital camera I feel I’m less specific knowing I can immediately see the outcome and try again. Though if I was using film, I wouldn’t know if my shot even turned out well until it was processed days later. I’d also only have 24- 36 shots, where a 16GB SD card will give me 644 shots on RAW format alone. Once Film is used and developed it becomes a negative. Permanently changed and non re-useable. A memory card is very re-usable, I can transfer the images onto an iPad, PC/Mac, or other storage device and keep shooting. The size is also great, I’d rather carry a couple of durable SD cards than a a couple of rolls of film that can degrade from heat, humidity or even airport security. Areas of danger using memory cards are accidental deletion of photos, data corruption, breaking the card or water damage. Though you should not have your camera close to water anyways unless it’s protected from that.

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The best time to learn about a camera feature is before you need it.

Yesterday I went to a Barnes & Noble in Burbank after my interview at Fry’s. I was browsing the $2.00 books section when I found a Guide Book for my exact Canon Model. The book was originally $20.00, so it was definitely worth it.  I have to get started reading it fast because I have a wedding in Colorado next month to shoot. I’m a little nervous about it, so I’ve got to practice a bit. 

A camera is basically a box holding a lens that focuses light onto a light-sensitive frame. In Film photography, the light-sensitive frame is a piece of film that is developed with chemicals later on. In Digital photography, the frame is an image sensor that converts light into voltages. The voltages are then converted into data that represents the pixels to make up the image. Therefore developing it within the camera. 

The shutter and aperture on film and digital cameras are almost exactly the same because they share the same function, to deliver a specific amount of light to create the type of picture you’re looking to get. Though digital camera’s image sensors react differently to light. They will cut out at brighter tones while film blends them well. 

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Permalink Went to the Jet Propulsion Lab today. Truly speechless at the amazing things they do there and I learned quite a bit of new things during the visit.
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